Essay Topics
Types of Essays
Essay Checklist
Word Counter
Readability Score
Essay Rewriter
The environment of planet Earth is being harmed and the causes of environmental degradation are mostly man made. Natural resources are being exploited to provide energy, food, and technology for an ever-growing global population. In the process, the globe is warming at an unprecedented rate, water and air are being polluted, and forests are being destroyed; however, awareness and education are encouraging the search for environmental first aid. The climate change occurring now, which affects every continent and ocean, has both human and natural causes. Developing land to support human activities, harvesting forests, and burning fossil fuels are human contributions to the problem; while volcanic activity, intensity of the Sun, Earth's orbit, and the interaction of the atmosphere and oceans are natural causes. Greenhouse gases are natural and help keep the planet warm by trapping heat in the atmosphere, but the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation are exacerbating this effect. Since the Industrial Revolution, increasing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere have caused global temperatures to rise and at an even higher rate over the last 30 years (EPA). The consequences of global warming include a drastic increase in the number of hurricanes, tropical storms, heat waves, and terrible droughts in the southeastern and southwestern United States, Europe, and Africa (Colemen & Kerbo); melting ice in the Arctic and melting glaciers worldwide, rising ocean temperatures and sea levels, and acidification of the oceans caused by higher carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere (EPA). The Earth's water and air are being polluted by tremendous amounts of toxins being produced and expelled into the atmosphere and oceans by coal, oil, and natural gas used for power generation. Other culprits are oil refineries, steel mills, and chemical plants; but the biggest contributor to air pollution in North America is transportation. Normally, natural processes and rain would clean the air, but the pollution is so great that natural processes can no longer keep air quality at an acceptable level. Air pollution can have significant health consequences including lung cancer, emphysema, and heart disease. Earth's clean water supply is provided by a cycle of evaporation and rain, but the population explosion created such huge amounts of garbage and industrial waste being dumped into lakes and oceans that the natural cleaning process can not keep up, much like natural air cleaning. Organic waste is also a contributing factor in water pollution. In small amounts, waterborne bacteria break down organic waste but breaking down large quantities of waste uses up the oxygen in the water causing the death of fish and other organisms. Water pollutants such as mercury, arsenic, and pesticides can be passed to humans through the food chain (Coleman and Kerbo, 2009). Currently, about 30 percent of the world's land area is covered by forests, but every year parcels the size of Panama are lost. At the current rate of deforestation, in one hundred years the rainforests will completely disappear. The major reason for deforestation is to provide land for agricultural use. Other reasons are to provide wood, material for paper products, to accommodate urban sprawl, and to build roads. Forests provide habitat for 70 percent of Earth's land animals and plants, and countless species will not survive the destruction of the forests. Trees absorb greenhouse gases, so fewer forests means more of these gases in the atmosphere and an acceleration of global warming (National Geographic). These are a few of the environmental issues affecting Earth but, although they sound dire, there is hope for improvement. The decline in the global birthrate will mean fewer natural resources will be exploited, fewer fossil fuels will be needed for energy, and less waste will be produced. There is also hope that renewable energy sources such as solar and wind power will continue to expand. In 2005, 30 percent of global power generation investments were in renewable energy (Bozen, Campbell, and Lindstrand, 2007). Environmental issues first came to the forefront in 1970 when the first Earth Day was celebrated. Earth Day was the brainchild of Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-Wisconsin) who wanted to raise awareness of the effects of pollution on the environment. At that time, protecting the planet and its resources was not part of the public discourse, even though pollutants were being pumped into the air, lakes, and rivers. In 1969, Cleveland's Cuyahoga River caught fire because of pollution caused by the discharge of chemical waste into the river. Because of Senator Nelson's efforts, in 1971 25 percent of Americans said protecting the environment was an important goal, an increase of 2,500 percent over 1969. Several significant pieces of legislation were passed in the 1970s including the Clean Air Act, the Water Quality Improvement Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Toxic Substance Control Act, and the Surface Mining (strip mining) Control and Reclamation Act; and in December 1970, the Environmental Protection Agency was established. Earth Day went global in 1990 and in 2000 the focus of Earth Day was clean energy (History Channel). There are things that can be done to protect the Earth, the environment, millions of animal and plant species, and ourselves, but it will take a huge effort on the part of an enormous number of people. Global citizens need to get involved and make their voices heard to save the planet and humankind.
Essay Writing Checklist
The following guidelines are designed to give students a checklist to use, whether they are revising individually or as part of a peer review team.
Introduction
  • Is the main idea (i.e., the writer's opinion of the story title) stated clearly?
  • Is the introductory paragraph interesting? Does it make the reader want to keep on reading?
Body Paragraph
  • Does each body paragraph have a clear topic sentence that is related to the main idea of the essay?
  • Does each body paragraph include specific information from the text(including quoted evidence from the text, if required by the instructor)that supports the topic sentence?
  • Is there a clear plan for the order of the body paragraphs (i.e., order of importance, chronology in the story, etc.)?
  • Does each body paragraph transition smoothly to the next?
Conclusion
  • Is the main idea of the essay restated in different words?
  • Are the supporting ideas summarized succinctly and clearly?
  • Is the concluding paragraph interesting? Does it leave an impression on the reader?
Overall Essay
  • Is any important material left unsaid?
  • Is any material repetitious and unnecessary?
  • Has the writer tried to incorporate "voice" in the essay so that it has his/her distinctive mark?
  • Are there changes needed in word choice, sentence length and structure, etc.?
  • Are the quotations (if required) properly cited?
  • Has the essay been proofread for spelling, punctuation, grammar, etc.?
  • Does the essay have an interesting and appropriate title?
Global Trends in the Environment
Trending Essay Topics
Reference
Feel free to use content on this page for your website, blog or paper we only ask that you reference content back to us. Use the following code to link this page:
Terms · Privacy · Contact
Essay Topics © 2018

Global Trends In The Environment

Words: 871    Pages: 3    Paragraphs: 5    Sentences: 36    Read Time: 03:10
Highlight Text to add correction. Use an editor to spell check essay.
              The environment of planet Earth is being harmed and the causes of environmental degradation are mostly man made. Natural resources are being exploited to provide energy, food, and technology for an ever-growing global population. In the process, the globe is warming at an unprecedented rate, water and air are being polluted, and forests are being destroyed; however, awareness and education are encouraging the search for environmental first aid.
              The climate change occurring now, which affects every continent and ocean, has both human and natural causes. Developing land to support human activities, harvesting forests, and burning fossil fuels are human contributions to the problem; while volcanic activity, intensity of the Sun, Earth's orbit, and the interaction of the atmosphere and oceans are natural causes. Greenhouse gases are natural and help keep the planet warm by trapping heat in the atmosphere, but the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation are exacerbating this effect. Since the Industrial Revolution, increasing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere have caused global temperatures to rise and at an even higher rate over the last 30 years (EPA). The consequences of global warming include a drastic increase in the number of hurricanes, tropical storms, heat waves, and terrible droughts in the southeastern and southwestern United States, Europe, and Africa (Colemen & Kerbo); melting ice in the Arctic and melting glaciers worldwide, rising ocean temperatures and sea levels, and acidification of the oceans caused by higher carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere (EPA).
             
              The Earth's water and air are being polluted by tremendous amounts of toxins being produced and expelled into the atmosphere and oceans by coal, oil, and natural gas used for power generation. Other culprits are oil refineries, steel mills, and chemical plants; but the biggest contributor to air pollution in North America is transportation. Normally, natural processes and rain would clean the air, but the pollution is so great that natural processes can no longer keep air quality at an acceptable level. Air pollution can have significant health consequences including lung cancer, emphysema, and heart disease. Earth's clean water supply is provided by a cycle of evaporation and rain, but the population explosion created such huge amounts of garbage and industrial waste being dumped into lakes and oceans that the natural cleaning process can not keep up, much like natural air cleaning. Organic waste is also a contributing factor in water pollution. In small amounts, waterborne bacteria break down organic waste but breaking down large quantities of waste uses up the oxygen in the water causing the death of fish and other organisms. Water pollutants such as mercury, arsenic, and pesticides can be passed to humans through the food chain (Coleman and Kerbo, 2009).
             
              Currently, about 30 percent of the world's land area is covered by forests, but every year parcels the size of Panama are lost. At the current rate of deforestation, in one hundred years the rainforests will completely disappear. The major reason for deforestation is to provide land for agricultural use. Other reasons are to provide wood, material for paper products, to accommodate urban sprawl, and to build roads. Forests provide habitat for 70 percent of Earth's land animals and plants, and countless species will not survive the destruction of the forests. Trees absorb greenhouse gases, so fewer forests means more of these gases in the atmosphere and an acceleration of global warming (National Geographic).
             
              These are a few of the environmental issues affecting Earth but, although they sound dire, there is hope for improvement. The decline in the global birthrate will mean fewer natural resources will be exploited, fewer fossil fuels will be needed for energy, and less waste will be produced. There is also hope that renewable energy sources such as solar and wind power will continue to expand. In 2005, 30 percent of global power generation investments were in renewable energy (Bozen, Campbell, and Lindstrand, 2007). Environmental issues first came to the forefront in 1970 when the first Earth Day was celebrated. Earth Day was the brainchild of Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-Wisconsin) who wanted to raise awareness of the effects of pollution on the environment. At that time, protecting the planet and its resources was not part of the public discourse, even though pollutants were being pumped into the air, lakes, and rivers. In 1969, Cleveland's Cuyahoga River caught fire because of pollution caused by the discharge of chemical waste into the river. Because of Senator Nelson's efforts, in 1971 25 percent of Americans said protecting the environment was an important goal, an increase of 2,500 percent over 1969. Several significant pieces of legislation were passed in the 1970s including the Clean Air Act, the Water Quality Improvement Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Toxic Substance Control Act, and the Surface Mining (strip mining) Control and Reclamation Act; and in December 1970, the Environmental Protection Agency was established. Earth Day went global in 1990 and in 2000 the focus of Earth Day was clean energy (History Channel). There are things that can be done to protect the Earth, the environment, millions of animal and plant species, and ourselves, but it will take a huge effort on the part of an enormous number of people. Global citizens need to get involved and make their voices heard to save the planet and humankind.
Environment Essay 
+5
Works Cited

1. Bozon, I. H., Campbell, W. J., & Lindstrand, M. (2007). Global trends in energy. McKinsey Quarterly, (1), 46-55. Retrieved fromEBSCOhost.
2. Coleman, J. W., & Kerbo, H. R. (2009). The environment. In Social problems (10th ed., pp. 398-405). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
3. Earth Day. (n.d.). The History Channel Website. Retrieved October 10, 2011, from http://www.history.com/topics/earth-day
4. Global warming. (n.d.). Environment (deforestation). Retrieved October 10, 2011, from National Geographic website: http://einvironment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/global-warming/deforestation-overview
Tip: Use our Essay Rewriter to rewrite this essay and remove plagiarism.

Add Notes

Have suggestions, comments or ideas? Please share below. Don't forget to tag a friend or classmate.
clear
Formatting Help
Submit